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Doug Elmets

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News Update on Criminal Defendant Lauren Redfern / Civil-RICO Defendants Howard Dickstein and Spouse (Jeannine English) as The Leslie Brodie Report Launches Inquiry to Investigate Persistent Rumors Dickstein Officially Employed at Obama’s White House

Lauren Redfern

 Lauren Redfern, a former female Basalt High School gym teacher who had been charged with sexual assault on a student, was sentenced, but faces no prison time.

Lauren Redfern Basalt High

Lauren Redfern, 26, was sentenced Tuesday.

Redfern, 26, was arrested after she was caught by the school’s athletic director having sex with a student in the teacher’s restroom. At the time Redfern was charged with two felony counts of sexual assault on a child by a person in a position of trust with a pattern of sexual abuse, a class 3 felony.

“They were caught in a room they shouldn’t have been in together and that’s what started this investigation. And they admitted what was going on,” Eagle County Undersheriff Mike McWilliams told CBS4 shortly after Redfern’s arrest. Please continue @: http://tinyurl.com/ctcqgr9

Howard Dickstein / Jeannine English

Sacramento-based lobbyist Jeannine English — who served as a “public member” of the State Bar of California Board of Governors since 2006 — is no longer part of the board, TLR has learned.

English is married to Howard Dickstein –  a widely-known but controversial figure within California’s Tribal Gambling industry.

Recently, both Dickstein and English were named as defendants in two separate RICO suits —  advanced by  Spire Law Group and Dan Dydzak.

Dickstein , who is no stranger to litigation, has been previously named a defendant in a suit advanced by his client, members of the Yocha Dehe Wintun Nations (formerly known as the Ramsey Band of Wintun Indians), which owns and operates the Cache Creek Casino in Brooks, California, an unincorporated community in Yolo County.

In that action, the plaintiffs — who were represented by Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal, Cotchett, Pitre & McCarthy and legal ethics expert Michael Boli — alleged that Dickstein engaged in myriad fraudulent conduct, concealment, conversion (i.e. a non-criminal term referring to the act of theft), breaches of fiduciary duties, misrepresentations, and unjustly enriching himself with tribal money by defrauding the tribe of millions of dollars over more than a decade.


J STREET PAC: Richard Blum — Regent of the University of California and husband of United States Senator from California Dianne Feinstein; Controversial Indian gambling attorney RICO defendant Howard Dickstein — member of both Anti-Israel’s J Street PAC and J Street Gang of Greed, alongside Jerry Brown ; Dickstein’s wife, State Bar of California Board of Governors Public Member RICO defendant Jeannine English – Dickstein of AARP.


STATION CASINOS: Richard Blum — Regent of the University of California and husband of United States Senator from California Dianne Feinstein; Controversial Indian gambling attorney RICO defendant Howard Dickstein — member of both anti-Israel J Street PAC and J Street Gang of Greed, alongside Jerry Brown ; Dickstein’s wife, State Bar of California Board of Governors Public Member RICO Defendant Jeannine English – Dickstein of AARP.

Richard Lehman of Lehman Levi Pappas & SadlerJeannine Dickstein AKA Jeannine EnglishDuke EnergyReliant Energy
(L-R) Richard Lehman and Jeannine English of Sacramento-based lobbying firm Lehman English Kelly & O’Keefe which represented Duke Energy and Reliant Energy (Image: courtesy photos)

Richard Lehman of Lehman Levi Pappas & Sadler
(L-R) Richard Lehman and Howard Dickstein . Both Lehman and Dickstein are part of a team working for North Fork Rancheria of Mono Indians (Image: courtesy photos)

Howard Dicstein, Jerry Brown, Mark Friedman, Doug Elmets
Members of the “J Street Gang of Greed” (L-R ) California Governor Jerry Brown, Howard Dickstein of Dickstein & Zerbi, Mark Friedman of Fulcrum Property and Doug Elmets. Currently, the Elliott Building is occupied on separate floors by the offices of Howard Dickstein of Dickstein & Zerbi, Fulcrum Property’s Mark Friedman, Arlen Opper, Doug Elmets, Paula Lorenzo of Cache Creek Casino, and The California Tribal Business Alliance (CTBA). Dickstein, Friedman, and Opper were all named defendants in the matter of Rumsey Band of Wintun Indians / Cache Creek Casino v. Howard Dickstein. The penthouse unit is the official residence of California’s first couple — Governor Edmund Gerald “Jerry” Brown, Jr.  and his wife. (Image: courtesy photo) (Image:courtesy photos)

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Senator Barack Obama addresses a rather small group of people at the Law Offices of Howard Dickstein and Mark Friedman in Sacramento, California. 8/08/07

Host William Wagener Discusses Racketeer Influenced Corrupt Organizations Suit Against Joseph Dunn, Ronald George, Howard Dickstein, Jeannine English, Starr Babcock

Spire Law Group RICO Act Suit Against Alleged Racketeers Howard Dickstein, Spouse Jeannine Dickstein (AKA Jeannine English) , Douglas Winthrop, and Tom Girardi of Girardi & Keese

Rumsey Band Rancheria vs. Howard Dickstein In a civil action filed against Attorney Howard Dickstein, spouse of State Bar of California BOG member Jeannine English, it was alleged Dickstein engaged in “a course of dealing that involved breaches of trust and violations of duties of the most basic, and, indeed, sacred kind.” Including, but not limited to, using the client’s plane for personal trips to the south of France, Big Sur and Grand Prix events in Monte Carlo and Montreal for which he owes the client $1.2 million. In statements to the media, Howard Dickstein referred to the allegations as a “pack of lies,” while disparaging his client. Dickstein also stated that he plans to fight the suit and “fight hard.” Appearing on behalf of defendant Dickstein was Elliot Peters of Keker & Van Nest.

Lastly, amid conflicting reports and unanswered questions, The Leslie Brodie Report has launched a journalistic inquiry into persistent rumors Howard Dickstein was extended an offer to join Barack Obama’s White House.

 

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TIMELINE 2009: Yolo County’s Cache Creek Casino bets on expansion as revenue drops (TLR Note: Notice name of Bill Schreiber — one and same Bill Schreiber of Porter Novelli?)

The glitz, the stuffed buffet tables and even the thrilling clang of jackpots can’t disguise one thing: Local casinos are taking a hit.

Because of the recession and a general malaise in consumer confidence, gambling revenue at local tribal casinos is down, said Jason Dickerson, gambling policy analyst for the state.

“After a decade or more of strong growth in the industry, customers have pulled back on gambling,” said Dickerson, who works for the state Legislative Analyst’s Office. Dickerson said the local cutbacks are following a trend of “sharp retrenchment” statewide, nationally and even globally. “We’re finding that gambling is ultimately an entertainment product, and there’s been a broad pullback in consumer discretionary spending.”

The four tribal casinos in the Sacramento region — Jackson Rancheria Casino & Hotel, Cache Creek Casino Resort, Thunder Valley Casino and the recently opened Red Hawk Casino — won’t say if revenue has fallen, but said no layoffs are scheduled. But some casino officials admit at least a flattening in demand.

Financial records at tribal casinos are confidential, but Dickerson doesn’t doubt the slowdown in Indian gaming revenue. Even the governor’s budget reflects smaller contributions from tribes with casinos. With demand and revenue shrinking, tribal casinos are likewise halting or scaling back lavish expansion plans and beefing up marketing efforts to ride out the tough times.

In Southern California, employees are being laid off because of reduced revenue and traffic. He hopes it proves that Californians shouldn’t rely on tribal payments to state coffers.

“Some have thought that tribal payments would be a panacea, a great source of growth for many years, and we’re seeing that that’s flawed, that casinos are susceptible to economic conditions and are not going to grow infinitely,” he said. “Casinos will never solve our budget problems, it’s a miniscule component of our budget.”

Expansion on hold

One of the most visible examples of the downturn in gambling is at Thunder Valley in Lincoln, where construction on a planned ambitious expansion stopped in November. Thunder Valley spokesman Doug Elmets said the tribe, the United Auburn Indian Community, originally planned to add a 23-story hotel, nine-story parking garage, performance venue, childcare room and video game arcade.

“They put the expansion on hold three to six months to reassess the scope, given the uncertain market demands,” Elmets said. “They’re looking at whether they need as many square feet, number of suites and parking spaces as was originally planned.”

Elmets said the reassessment of the expansion is not a result of competition from the newly opened Red Hawk Casino on Highway 50 in Shingle Springs. In fact, he said, the hoopla surrounding Red Hawk’s Dec. 17 grand opening and advertising for the new casino has strengthened the regional gaming market overall. Still, he said the flagging economy has impacted Thunder Valley’s bottom line.

“The economy is affecting casinos,” Elmets said. “Casinos are not immune to what is happening in the general economy. We find the same number of customers are coming to Thunder Valley, but spending less than last year.”

Strong regional market

Elmets pointed out that even though visitors might be more frugal, the Sacramento gambling market is “ripe for maturity,” since 5 million people live within a 100-mile radius of Thunder Valley and Red Hawk, and 60 percent of the residents in the market area are adults over 21.

“All the reports we’re hearing is that the gaming market in Sacramento has been one of strongest investments in the U.S. for decades, because Sacramento has historically been one of the biggest feeder markets to casinos in northern Nevada,” Elmets said.

Rich Hoffman, chief executive officer of Jackson Rancheria in Amador County, said Red Hawk’s opening caused a brief bump in business at the older foothills casino, thanks to overall awareness being raised by the extra advertising. Hoffman said 2008 gross revenue at Jackson Rancheria was up about 4.5 percent over 2007, but when the cost of living and increased expenses were factored in, “it’s pretty much a push.” The casino historically has seen steady growth, so he characterized 2008 as a “slowdown for us.”

“I feel good about that when I think about where some our colleagues in the state are,” Hoffman said. “Many casinos are seeing double-digit drops in revenue, so I feel very fortunate. Especially in more mature markets in Southern California, they’re taking a beating.”

Building a destination

Cache Creek Casino Resort in Yolo County is also feeling the pinch of consumers spending less.

“The slowdown in the economy has had some impact on our business, as it has on every other business in the country,” Cache Creek general manager Randy Takemoto said in a prepared statement. “We have found we have slightly fewer customers than in prior years, though there has been a noticeable drop in spending.”

That pinch, however, hasn’t dampened Cache Creek’s plans to expand. Takemoto said the tribe re-evaluated plans for its “destination resort project” and found it still made sense. The expansion will include a spa, golf course, additional restaurants and entertainment venues.

Yolo County supervisors are challenging the project because of environmental concerns, including increased traffic on Highway 16. The tribe and the county recently went to arbitration over the disputed expansion project.

Takemoto said the Cache Creek expansion would create 1,000 new jobs at the casino, to add to the 2,500 current positions, “as well as hundreds of construction jobs in the heavily impacted building industry.” Cache Creek spokesman Bill Schreiber said Yolo County’s unemployment rate is more than 9 percent, and the proposed expansion could infuse $95 million into the local economy.

Source: http://www.bizjournals.com/sacramento/stories/2009/02/09/focus3.html?page=all

J Street’s Colette Avital, A Victim of Sexual Assault / Adulterer For 14 Years, Hereby Asked To Opine On J Street PAC BOD Member — Controversial Gambling Attorney Howard Dickstein’s Denials Re Sexual Assault at Thunder Valley Casino in Lincoln, CA

Howard Dickstein on Sexual Assaults in Casino

Howard Dickstein on Sexual Assaults in Casino 2Howard Dickstein on Sexual Assaults at Thunder Valley Casino

 

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avital mk 298 AJ

Photo: Ariel Jerozolimski [file]

Labor Party presidential candidate Colette Avital revealed in an interview with Channel 2 on Thursday that one of her bosses when she worked in the Foreign Ministry tried to attack her sexually.

“It happened many years ago and I defended myself,” Avital said. “We women are not defenseless if you know how to object and push people away.”

Avital considered (Shimon) Peres her mentor, but in the Channel 2 interview she denied rumors of an affair with Peres when she was Israel’s consul-general in New York. “There never was an affair, just like Peres never had an Arab mother,” Avital said, dismissing another well-known rumor about the vice premier.

Please continue @:

http://www.jpost.com/Israel/Article.aspx?id=51697

 

Admission by Colette Avital to a 14 year extramarital affair with a married man, please see @:

http://lesliebrodie.posterous.com/orly-taitz-american-patriot-former-resident-o

 

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Howard Dickstein, a widely-known but controversial figure within California’s Tribal Gambling industry, has been named a defendant in a suit seeking unspecified monetary damages. Also named as defendant is Dickstein’s wife, Sacramento-based lobbyist Jeannine English.

The lawsuit alleges that Dickstein and English executed a scheme that caused injury to the Plaintiff, a Southern California resident who claims his privacy and constitutional rights were “egregiously violated.”

Specifically, the suit alleges that in order to camouflage a scheme and make it appear as though it is purely a mundane action by a governmental agency and was not designed to conceal Dickstein’s and English’s own acts of malfeasance, greed, and betrayal, defendants resorted to abusing their considerable “political and legal clout.”

This clout was presumably obtained as a result of the funneling of hundreds of millions of dollars from myriad Tribal Casinos to various state and local governmental agencies/officials, as well as from English’s position as a member of the State Bar of California Board of Governors, and the fact that the president of the State Bar of California, Jon Streeter, and his firm of Keker & Van Nest, represent Howard Dickstein. This , the plaintiff alleges, shows “malice and oppression” on the part of defendants sufficient to justify an award of punitive damages.

Dickstein , who is no stranger to litigation, has been previously named a defendant in a suit advanced by his client, members of the Yocha Dehe Wintun Nations (formerly known as the Ramsey Band of Wintun Indians), which owns and operates the Cache Creek Casino in Brooks, California, an unincorporated community in Yolo County.

In that action, the plaintiffs — who were represented by Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal, Cotchett, Pitre & McCarthy and legal ethics expert Michael Boli — alleged that Dickstein engaged in myriad fraudulent conduct, concealment, conversion (i.e. a non-criminal term referring to the act of theft), breaches of fiduciary duties, misrepresentations, and unjustly enriching himself with tribal money by defrauding the tribe of millions of dollars over more than a decade.

While the suit was pending, further allegations of grave misconduct were leveled against Dickstein and his attorneys of San Francisco-based Keker & Van Nest including claims that evidence was “manufactured.” Later, Dickstein and his lawyers of Keker & Van Nest (presumably, John Keker, Elliot Peters, and Jon Streeter) falsely advertised and misled the public into believing that the Yocha Dehe tribe had only sued Dickstein for conduct which was “negligent” in nature. Dickstein and his legal team neglected to reference the allegations of defrauding the tribe of millions of dollars over more than a decade through fraudulent conduct, concealment, conversion, breaches of fiduciary duties, and misrepresentations which the tribe had leveled against their own attorney.

In nearby Placer County, situated between the cities of Roseville and Lincoln, 50 miles east of Yolo County, where the United Auburn Indian Community operates the Thunder Valley Casino, allegations of greed and betrayal were also leveled against Howard Dickstein by the former chairwoman of the United Auburn Indian Community, the Honorable Jessica Tavares and long-time tribal council member Dolly Suehead.

According to media reports, Tribal Administrator Greg Baker — a Dickstein confederate — disallowed a tribe-funded mailing of a campaign mailer that claims the United Auburn Indian Community has been “bamboozled by an attorney [Howard Dickstein] more interested in filling his garage with Ferraris than serving the interest of our tribe, and the greed of a tribal council that rubber stamps his decision and no longer looks after our best interests.”

Baker, who as it turned out was involved in a separate and unrelated financial scheme, was recently suspended following on the heels of an IRS investigation into allegations of fraud and money-laundering. In affidavits filed by an IRS investigator, it was alleged that Baker was part of a scheme to over-bill the casino/tribe by more than $18 million, which would later be “kicked-back.”

Roman Porter — a long time ally and confederate of California Democratic Party operative Joseph Dunn of embattled online publication Voice of OC who now serves as the executive director of the State Bar of California — was recently hired as Thunder Valley Casino’s new tribal administrator.

 

 


The Elliott Building, 1530 J Street Sacramento, CA 95814. The building is owned by Mark Friedman of Fulcrum Properly Group.  Currently, the Elliott Building is occupied on separate floors by the offices of Howard Dickstein of Dickstein & Zerbi, Fulcrum Property’s Mark Friedman, Arlen Opper, Doug Elmets, Paula Lorenzo of Cache Creek Casino, and The California Tribal Business Alliance (CTBA).
Dickstein, Friedman, and Opper were all named defendants in the matter of Rumsey Band of Wintun Indians / Cache Creek Casino v. Howard Dickstein. The penthouse unit is the official residence of California’s first couple — Governor Edmund Gerald “Jerry” Brown, Jr.  and his wife. (Image: courtesy photo)

The abuse and financial atrocities by attorney Howard Dickstein (on behalf of himself, as well as others) against his clients — Native Americans who are members of various Indian tribes operating casinos in the State of California — is well documented.

Hard hit were the Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation which operates the Cache Creek Casino in Yolo County, the Pala Band of Mission Indians which operates the Pala Casino Resort & Spa in San Diego County, and the United Auburn Indian Community which operates the Thunder Valley Casino in Placer County.

One such incident resulted in the emotionally distressing injustice inflicted on the bona fide founder of Thunder Valley Casino, the ex-chair of the tribe, Jessica Tavares.

Jessica is a proud visionary who was the force behind the economic and cultural revival of the tribe — as well as the revival of surrounding communities.  Sadly, Jessica was ultimately betrayed by a fellow member of the tribe and placed on the proverbial iceberg because she chose honor, integrity, and dignity for herself and for the tribe over the greed and divisiveness promoted by Howard Dickstein in his quest to obtained millions for himself and by extension for his wife,  Jeannine English.

Since 2006, Jeannine English has served as a “public member” of the State Bar of California Board of Governors, an otherwise governmental entity primarily responsible to disciplining errant lawyers.  Despite allegations that Dickstein has committed countless acts of grave misconduct and ethical breaches, Dickstein has never been disciplined by the State Bar of California.  English’s appointment as a public member was courtesy of her California Democratic Party confederates who control California’s legislative branch.

Unfortunately, the two U.S. Senators from California refuse to become involved in these issues despite the fact that  tribal matters fall primarily within federal oversight. Dickstein, in his role as counsel for the tribes, has overseen the tribes’ contributions of millions of dollars to the coffers of the Democratic Party.

Fortunately, Republican Arizona Senator John McCain recently stepped in and called for an investigation of Howard Dickstein.  Similarly, a few months prior to Senator McCain’s announcement, a Yolo County-based rabbi asked the State Bar of California Board of Governors to investigate English and Dickstein.

The J Street Gang of Greed

In approximately 2004, as part of an effort to revitalize its downtown area, the city of Sacramento poured three million dollars into subsidies for the renovation of the “Elliott Building” located at 1530 J Street in Sacramento.  The project was initiated by Mark Friedman of Sacramento-based Fulcrum Property Group and a few of his business partners.

Howard Dicstein, Jerry Brown, Mark Friedman, Doug Elmets
(L-R) California Governor Jerry Brown, Howard Dickstein of Dickstein & Zerbi, Mark Friedman of Fulcrum Property and Doug Elmets (Image:courtesy photos)

Friedman, a man of despicable character, may be a stranger to readers, but he is no stranger to The Leslie Brodie Report given that he was one of the  named defendants in the case of Rumsey vs. Dickstein, which deals primarily with allegations of years of fraud and deceit by Dickstein against his client, the Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation.

One example of such a scheme allegedly perpetrated by Dickstein and Friedman against the tribe deals with a parcel of land situated in West-Sacramento  known as “The Triangle,” an otherwise prime location facing the Sacramento River.

The tribe was urged by defendants Dickstein and its financial advisor Arlen Opper to enter into yet another business relationship with Friedman, through which a parcel of land in “The Triangle” was purchased.  The tribe would own 50% and Friedman and his extended would own 50% of the property.

At one point, Mark Friedman asked the tribe for a favor (or as he put it, an “accommodation”), by which the tribe would sell and Friedman would purchase the tribe’s 50% share in “The Triangle.”

Friedman’s excuse  for seeking the “accommodation” was very simple — he wanted to reduce the amount of money he would  owe the Internal Revenue Service.  Friedman had just sold a different piece of real estate, and  needed to quickly invest the money in real estate (or as he referred to it, to “park” the money ) in a separate property for a period of several years as is allowed by IRS rules; at the period, the tribe would be allowed to buy the property back for the same price for which it was sold to Friedman per a “buy back option.”

Dickstein and Opper recommended that the tribe “accommodate” Friedman, and Friedman consequently purchased the property from the tribe.

Per their written agreement, the tribe was given the option to buy back the property within one year.  However, the tribe did not buy back the property within one as  a result of a failure by Arlen Opper and Howard Dickstein — the attorney for the tribe who was in possession of the written agreement — to inform the tribe when the time period expired so that the tribe could buy back the property.  Notably, the property had increased in value “exponentially” during this period.

Later,  after the “buy back option” had expired, the tribe realized that it had missed the deadline to buy back its 50% share of the property, and sought to do so at that time.  However, Mark Friedman refused to sell it back, claiming that the tribe had missed its deadline.

 

Colette Avital of J Street – Entity Associated with Jeremy Ben Ami and Controversial Gambling Attorney Howard Dickstein – On Comprehensive Two State Solution( Note: Avital an adulterer who carried on an affair for 14 Years – rumored with Shimon Peres)

Coavital.jpg
Colette Avital

Colette Avital: “I think that without a comprehensive peace plan in the Middle East it will be very difficult to deal with the Iran issue so I do welcome the thinking of the current administration in Washington that everything has to be addressed on a regional basis.”

Please see complete story @:

http://jstreet.org/supporters/profile/1/Colette-Avital

Separately, and was reported  here earlier, Howard Dickstein of J Street PAC, who is  widely-known but controversial figure within California’s Tribal Gambling industry, has been named a defendant in a suit seeking unspecified monetary damages. Also named as defendant is Dickstein’s wife, Sacramento-based lobbyist Jeannine English.

The lawsuit alleges that Dickstein and English executed a scheme that caused injury to the Plaintiff, a Southern California resident who claims his privacy and constitutional rights were “egregiously violated.”


The Elliott Building, 1530 J Street Sacramento, CA 95814. The building is owned by Mark Friedman of Fulcrum Properly Group.  Currently, the Elliott Building is occupied on separate floors by the offices of Howard Dickstein of Dickstein & Zerbi, Fulcrum Property’s Mark Friedman, Arlen Opper, Doug Elmets, Paula Lorenzo of Cache Creek Casino, and The California Tribal Business Alliance (CTBA).
Dickstein, Friedman, and Opper were all named defendants in the matter of Rumsey Band of Wintun Indians / Cache Creek Casino v. Howard Dickstein. The penthouse unit is the official residence of California’s first couple — Governor Edmund Gerald “Jerry” Brown, Jr.  and his wife. (Image: courtesy photo)

Specifically, the suit alleges that in order to camouflage a scheme and make it appear as though it is purely a mundane action by a governmental agency and was not designed to conceal Dickstein’s and English’s own acts of malfeasance, greed, and betrayal, defendants resorted to abusing their considerable “political and legal clout.”

This clout was presumably obtained as a result of the funneling of hundreds of millions of dollars from myriad Tribal Casinos to various state and local governmental agencies/officials, as well as from English’s position as a member of the State Bar of California Board of Governors, and the fact that the president of the State Bar of California, Jon Streeter, and his firm of Keker & Van Nest, represent Howard Dickstein. This , the plaintiff alleges, shows “malice and oppression” on the part of defendants sufficient to justify an award of punitive damages.

Dickstein , who is no stranger to litigation, has been previously named a defendant in a suit advanced by his client, members of the Yocha Dehe Wintun Nations (formerly known as the Ramsey Band of Wintun Indians), which owns and operates the Cache Creek Casino in Brooks, California, an unincorporated community in Yolo County.

In that action, the plaintiffs — who were represented by Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal, Cotchett, Pitre & McCarthy and legal ethics expert Michael Boli — alleged that Dickstein engaged in myriad fraudulent conduct, concealment, conversion (i.e. a non-criminal term referring to the act of theft), breaches of fiduciary duties, misrepresentations, and unjustly enriching himself with tribal money by defrauding the tribe of millions of dollars over more than a decade.

According to media reports, Tribal Administrator Greg Baker — a Dickstein confederate — disallowed a tribe-funded mailing of a campaign mailer that claims the United Auburn Indian Community has been “bamboozled by an attorney [Howard Dickstein] more interested in filling his garage with Ferraris than serving the interest of our tribe, and the greed of a tribal council that rubber stamps his decision and no longer looks after our best interests.”

Baker, who as it turned out was involved in a separate and unrelated financial scheme, was recently suspended following on the heels of an IRS investigation into allegations of fraud and money-laundering. In affidavits filed by an IRS investigator, it was alleged that Baker was part of a scheme to over-bill the casino/tribe by more than $18 million, which would later be “kicked-back.”

Roman Porter — a long time ally and confederate of California Democratic Party operative Joseph Dunn of embattled online publication Voice of OC who now serves as the executive director of the State Bar of California — was recently hired as Thunder Valley Casino’s new tribal administrator.

The J Street Gang of Greed

In approximately 2004, as part of an effort to revitalize its downtown area, the city of Sacramento poured three million dollars into subsidies for the renovation of the “Elliott Building” located at 1530 J Street in Sacramento.  The project was initiated by Mark Friedman of Sacramento-based Fulcrum Property Group and a few of his business partners.

Howard Dicstein, Jerry Brown, Mark Friedman, Doug Elmets
(L-R) California Governor Jerry Brown, Howard Dickstein of Dickstein & Zerbi, Mark Friedman of Fulcrum Property and Doug Elmets (Image:courtesy photos)

Friedman, a man of despicable character, may be a stranger to readers, but he is no stranger to The Leslie Brodie Report given that he was one of the  named defendants in the case of Rumsey vs. Dickstein, which deals primarily with allegations of years of fraud and deceit by Dickstein against his client, the Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation.

One example of such a scheme allegedly perpetrated by Dickstein and Friedman against the tribe deals with a parcel of land situated in West-Sacramento  known as “The Triangle,” an otherwise prime location facing the Sacramento River.

The tribe was urged by defendants Dickstein and its financial advisor Arlen Opper to enter into yet another business relationship with Friedman, through which a parcel of land in “The Triangle” was purchased.  The tribe would own 50% and Friedman and his extended would own 50% of the property.

At one point, Mark Friedman asked the tribe for a favor (or as he put it, an “accommodation”), by which the tribe would sell and Friedman would purchase the tribe’s 50% share in “The Triangle.”

Friedman’s excuse  for seeking the “accommodation” was very simple — he wanted to reduce the amount of money he would  owe the Internal Revenue Service.  Friedman had just sold a different piece of real estate, and  needed to quickly invest the money in real estate (or as he referred to it, to “park” the money ) in a separate property for a period of several years as is allowed by IRS rules; at the period, the tribe would be allowed to buy the property back for the same price for which it was sold to Friedman per a “buy back option.”

Dickstein and Opper recommended that the tribe “accommodate” Friedman, and Friedman consequently purchased the property from the tribe.

Per their written agreement, the tribe was given the option to buy back the property within one year.  However, the tribe did not buy back the property within one as  a result of a failure by Arlen Opper and Howard Dickstein — the attorney for the tribe who was in possession of the written agreement — to inform the tribe when the time period expired so that the tribe could buy back the property.  Notably, the property had increased in value “exponentially” during this period.

Later,  after the “buy back option” had expired, the tribe realized that it had missed the deadline to buy back its 50% share of the property, and sought to do so at that time.  However, Mark Friedman refused to sell it back, claiming that the tribe had missed its deadline.

 

Orly Taitz Assails Dianne Feinstein / J. Street PAC — Entity Associated with Jeremy Ben-Ami and Controversial Gambling Attorney Howard Dickstein of Sacramento, California

Prominent California attorney, Rancho Santa Margarita-based Dr. Orly Taitz has declared in no uncertain terms her opposition to left-wing Israel advocacy group J Street.  The announcement came on the heels of Dianne Feinstein’s acceptance of an  endorsement from the highly controversial J Street — an entity headed by Jeremy Ben-Ami. 

In reply to Feinstein’s endorsement, embattled gambling attorney Howard Dickstein of Sacramento-based Dickstein & Zerbi J stated to the media: “Her (Feinstein) views were very close, if not identical, to J Street’s,” said Howard , a board member of J Street’s political action committee .

Taitz, who is running against Feinstein adamantly opposes the J-Street/Feinstein position, stated:

“J-street is a far Left organization which advocates cutting up Jerusalem and giving a big part of Jerusalem to Palestinians, dismantling all of the Jewish settlements and towns in Judea and Samaria. They are more radical than many Palestinians. The fact that Feinstein accepted their endorsement speaks volumes. Feinstein is the chair of the Senate Intelligence committee. Endorsing such radical views will not promote peace and doesn’t mesh with her position as chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee.”

Separately, and was reported  here earlier, Dickstein, who is  widely-known but controversial figure within California’s Tribal Gambling industry, has been named a defendant in a suit seeking unspecified monetary damages. Also named as defendant is Dickstein’s wife, Sacramento-based lobbyist Jeannine English.

The lawsuit alleges that Dickstein and English executed a scheme that caused injury to the Plaintiff, a Southern California resident who claims his privacy and constitutional rights were “egregiously violated.”


The Elliott Building, 1530 J Street Sacramento, CA 95814. The building is owned by Mark Friedman of Fulcrum Properly Group.  Currently, the Elliott Building is occupied on separate floors by the offices of Howard Dickstein of Dickstein & Zerbi, Fulcrum Property’s Mark Friedman, Arlen Opper, Doug Elmets, Paula Lorenzo of Cache Creek Casino, and The California Tribal Business Alliance (CTBA).
Dickstein, Friedman, and Opper were all named defendants in the matter of Rumsey Band of Wintun Indians / Cache Creek Casino v. Howard Dickstein. The penthouse unit is the official residence of California’s first couple — Governor Edmund Gerald “Jerry” Brown, Jr.  and his wife. (Image: courtesy photo)

Specifically, the suit alleges that in order to camouflage a scheme and make it appear as though it is purely a mundane action by a governmental agency and was not designed to conceal Dickstein’s and English’s own acts of malfeasance, greed, and betrayal, defendants resorted to abusing their considerable “political and legal clout.”

This clout was presumably obtained as a result of the funneling of hundreds of millions of dollars from myriad Tribal Casinos to various state and local governmental agencies/officials, as well as from English’s position as a member of the State Bar of California Board of Governors, and the fact that the president of the State Bar of California, Jon Streeter, and his firm of Keker & Van Nest, represent Howard Dickstein. This , the plaintiff alleges, shows “malice and oppression” on the part of defendants sufficient to justify an award of punitive damages.

Dickstein , who is no stranger to litigation, has been previously named a defendant in a suit advanced by his client, members of the Yocha Dehe Wintun Nations (formerly known as the Ramsey Band of Wintun Indians), which owns and operates the Cache Creek Casino in Brooks, California, an unincorporated community in Yolo County.

In that action, the plaintiffs — who were represented by Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal, Cotchett, Pitre & McCarthy and legal ethics expert Michael Boli — alleged that Dickstein engaged in myriad fraudulent conduct, concealment, conversion (i.e. a non-criminal term referring to the act of theft), breaches of fiduciary duties, misrepresentations, and unjustly enriching himself with tribal money by defrauding the tribe of millions of dollars over more than a decade.

According to media reports, Tribal Administrator Greg Baker — a Dickstein confederate — disallowed a tribe-funded mailing of a campaign mailer that claims the United Auburn Indian Community has been “bamboozled by an attorney [Howard Dickstein] more interested in filling his garage with Ferraris than serving the interest of our tribe, and the greed of a tribal council that rubber stamps his decision and no longer looks after our best interests.”

Baker, who as it turned out was involved in a separate and unrelated financial scheme, was recently suspended following on the heels of an IRS investigation into allegations of fraud and money-laundering. In affidavits filed by an IRS investigator, it was alleged that Baker was part of a scheme to over-bill the casino/tribe by more than $18 million, which would later be “kicked-back.”

Roman Porter — a long time ally and confederate of California Democratic Party operative Joseph Dunn of embattled online publication Voice of OC who now serves as the executive director of the State Bar of California — was recently hired as Thunder Valley Casino’s new tribal administrator.

The J Street Gang of Greed

In approximately 2004, as part of an effort to revitalize its downtown area, the city of Sacramento poured three million dollars into subsidies for the renovation of the “Elliott Building” located at 1530 J Street in Sacramento.  The project was initiated by Mark Friedman of Sacramento-based Fulcrum Property Group and a few of his business partners.

Howard Dicstein, Jerry Brown, Mark Friedman, Doug Elmets
(L-R) California Governor Jerry Brown, Howard Dickstein of Dickstein & Zerbi, Mark Friedman of Fulcrum Property and Doug Elmets (Image:courtesy photos)

Friedman, a man of despicable character, may be a stranger to readers, but he is no stranger to The Leslie Brodie Report given that he was one of the  named defendants in the case of Rumsey vs. Dickstein, which deals primarily with allegations of years of fraud and deceit by Dickstein against his client, the Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation.

One example of such a scheme allegedly perpetrated by Dickstein and Friedman against the tribe deals with a parcel of land situated in West-Sacramento  known as “The Triangle,” an otherwise prime location facing the Sacramento River.

The tribe was urged by defendants Dickstein and its financial advisor Arlen Opper to enter into yet another business relationship with Friedman, through which a parcel of land in “The Triangle” was purchased.  The tribe would own 50% and Friedman and his extended would own 50% of the property.

At one point, Mark Friedman asked the tribe for a favor (or as he put it, an “accommodation”), by which the tribe would sell and Friedman would purchase the tribe’s 50% share in “The Triangle.”

Friedman’s excuse  for seeking the “accommodation” was very simple — he wanted to reduce the amount of money he would  owe the Internal Revenue Service.  Friedman had just sold a different piece of real estate, and  needed to quickly invest the money in real estate (or as he referred to it, to “park” the money ) in a separate property for a period of several years as is allowed by IRS rules; at the period, the tribe would be allowed to buy the property back for the same price for which it was sold to Friedman per a “buy back option.”

Dickstein and Opper recommended that the tribe “accommodate” Friedman, and Friedman consequently purchased the property from the tribe.

Per their written agreement, the tribe was given the option to buy back the property within one year.  However, the tribe did not buy back the property within one as  a result of a failure by Arlen Opper and Howard Dickstein — the attorney for the tribe who was in possession of the written agreement — to inform the tribe when the time period expired so that the tribe could buy back the property.  Notably, the property had increased in value “exponentially” during this period.

Later,  after the “buy back option” had expired, the tribe realized that it had missed the deadline to buy back its 50% share of the property, and sought to do so at that time.  However, Mark Friedman refused to sell it back, claiming that the tribe had missed its deadline.

Howard Dickstein of J Street Gang of Greed — also member of J Street’s PAC– a left-wing Israel advocacy group which endorsed Dianne Feinstein (Note: 1- Google connection as is KVN 2- As alluded earlier,Dickstein-Feinstein Connection 3-Cotchett ?)

 This year, 23 neophytes have paid $3,480 each for the opportunity to challenge incumbent Sen. Dianne Feinstein, the doyenne of Congress’ Jewish contingent, who has held the seat since 1992. Under new rules, the top two vote-getters in today’s primary will proceed to the general election in November—regardless of party registration. With the opposition candidates all polling below 5 percent, that opens up a window of opportunity for long-shot gadflies to make it to the general election ballot.

The list includes Orly Taitz, the Soviet Jewish émigré who styles herself the queen of the birther movement, and Nachum Shifren, formerly known as Norm, a native Malibu surf rat and Hasidic rabbi who, according to London’s Jewish Chronicle, once worked as a driver for the extremist leader Meir Kahane and more recently traveled to Britain to rally with the English Defence League, a nationalist, anti-Islam group. “Many of the other candidates,” said Jack Pitney, a political-science professor at Claremont McKenna College, “are an organic mix of nuts and vegetables.”

The likelihood that Feinstein will actually be unseated is accordingly negligible. She is one of the most popular politicians in the state, and despite being the victim of a $4.5 million campaign-funds embezzlement scam, she holds a cash advantage of $2.5 million over the official candidate of the state Republican Party, an autism activist named Elizabeth Emken. All of which explains why the announcement late last week that Feinstein had accepted the endorsement of the left-wing Israel advocacy group J Street was met not with the vitriol many pro-Israel groups heaped on Democrat Joe Sestak, J Street’s candidate in Pennsylvania’s 2010 Senate race, but with silence.

 

J Street, which launched in 2008 with ambitions to act as a progressive counterweight to the behemoth American Israel Public Affairs Committee, has struggled to find entree with Congress’ senior players. Feinstein lends them much-needed gravitas. “J Street is establishing itself as an element of the mainstream Jewish community,” said J Street’s head, Jeremy Ben-Ami.

J Street made its approach in April, after Feinstein wrote an op-ed for the San Francisco Chronicle defending Obama’s diplomatic approach toward Iran. “Her views were very close, if not identical, to J Street’s,” said Howard Dickstein, a board member of J Street’s political action committee and Sacramento lawyer who made his fortune representing Indian tribal gambling interests. “I don’t think she has to be fearful of any kind of retaliation or pushback.” Dickstein was joined in making the ask by J Street advisory board member Carol Winograd, a retired Stanford University professor of medicine and biology whose husband, Terry, served as a Ph.D. adviser to Google co-founder Larry Page. (Together, the Winograds have given more than $600,000 to Democratic causes in the past three cycles.)

 

Please continue @

http://www.tabletmag.com/jewish-news-and-politics/101527/j-streets-new-senate…

——

Separately, and was reported  here earlier, Howard Dickstein, a widely-known but controversial figure within California’s Tribal Gambling industry, has been named a defendant in a suit seeking unspecified monetary damages. Also named as defendant is Dickstein’s wife, Sacramento-based lobbyist Jeannine English.

The lawsuit alleges that Dickstein and English executed a scheme that caused injury to the Plaintiff, a Southern California resident who claims his privacy and constitutional rights were “egregiously violated.”


The Elliott Building, 1530 J Street Sacramento, CA 95814. The building is owned by Mark Friedman of Fulcrum Properly Group.  Currently, the Elliott Building is occupied on separate floors by the offices of Howard Dickstein of Dickstein & Zerbi, Fulcrum Property’s Mark Friedman, Arlen Opper, Doug Elmets, Paula Lorenzo of Cache Creek Casino, and The California Tribal Business Alliance (CTBA).
Dickstein, Friedman, and Opper were all named defendants in the matter of Rumsey Band of Wintun Indians / Cache Creek Casino v. Howard Dickstein. The penthouse unit is the official residence of California’s first couple — Governor Edmund Gerald “Jerry” Brown, Jr.  and his wife. (Image: courtesy photo)

Specifically, the suit alleges that in order to camouflage a scheme and make it appear as though it is purely a mundane action by a governmental agency and was not designed to conceal Dickstein’s and English’s own acts of malfeasance, greed, and betrayal, defendants resorted to abusing their considerable “political and legal clout.”

This clout was presumably obtained as a result of the funneling of hundreds of millions of dollars from myriad Tribal Casinos to various state and local governmental agencies/officials, as well as from English’s position as a member of the State Bar of California Board of Governors, and the fact that the president of the State Bar of California, Jon Streeter, and his firm of Keker & Van Nest, represent Howard Dickstein. This , the plaintiff alleges, shows “malice and oppression” on the part of defendants sufficient to justify an award of punitive damages.

Dickstein , who is no stranger to litigation, has been previously named a defendant in a suit advanced by his client, members of the Yocha Dehe Wintun Nations (formerly known as the Ramsey Band of Wintun Indians), which owns and operates the Cache Creek Casino in Brooks, California, an unincorporated community in Yolo County.

In that action, the plaintiffs — who were represented by Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal, Cotchett, Pitre & McCarthy and legal ethics expert Michael Boli — alleged that Dickstein engaged in myriad fraudulent conduct, concealment, conversion (i.e. a non-criminal term referring to the act of theft), breaches of fiduciary duties, misrepresentations, and unjustly enriching himself with tribal money by defrauding the tribe of millions of dollars over more than a decade.

According to media reports, Tribal Administrator Greg Baker — a Dickstein confederate — disallowed a tribe-funded mailing of a campaign mailer that claims the United Auburn Indian Community has been “bamboozled by an attorney [Howard Dickstein] more interested in filling his garage with Ferraris than serving the interest of our tribe, and the greed of a tribal council that rubber stamps his decision and no longer looks after our best interests.”

Baker, who as it turned out was involved in a separate and unrelated financial scheme, was recently suspended following on the heels of an IRS investigation into allegations of fraud and money-laundering. In affidavits filed by an IRS investigator, it was alleged that Baker was part of a scheme to over-bill the casino/tribe by more than $18 million, which would later be “kicked-back.”

Roman Porter — a long time ally and confederate of California Democratic Party operative Joseph Dunn of embattled online publication Voice of OC who now serves as the executive director of the State Bar of California — was recently hired as Thunder Valley Casino’s new tribal administrator.

The J Street Gang of Greed

In approximately 2004, as part of an effort to revitalize its downtown area, the city of Sacramento poured three million dollars into subsidies for the renovation of the “Elliott Building” located at 1530 J Street in Sacramento.  The project was initiated by Mark Friedman of Sacramento-based Fulcrum Property Group and a few of his business partners.

Howard Dicstein, Jerry Brown, Mark Friedman, Doug Elmets
(L-R) California Governor Jerry Brown, Howard Dickstein of Dickstein & Zerbi, Mark Friedman of Fulcrum Property and Doug Elmets (Image:courtesy photos)

Friedman, a man of despicable character, may be a stranger to readers, but he is no stranger to The Leslie Brodie Report given that he was one of the  named defendants in the case of Rumsey vs. Dickstein, which deals primarily with allegations of years of fraud and deceit by Dickstein against his client, the Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation.

One example of such a scheme allegedly perpetrated by Dickstein and Friedman against the tribe deals with a parcel of land situated in West-Sacramento  known as “The Triangle,” an otherwise prime location facing the Sacramento River.

The tribe was urged by defendants Dickstein and its financial advisor Arlen Opper to enter into yet another business relationship with Friedman, through which a parcel of land in “The Triangle” was purchased.  The tribe would own 50% and Friedman and his extended would own 50% of the property.

At one point, Mark Friedman asked the tribe for a favor (or as he put it, an “accommodation”), by which the tribe would sell and Friedman would purchase the tribe’s 50% share in “The Triangle.”

Friedman’s excuse  for seeking the “accommodation” was very simple — he wanted to reduce the amount of money he would  owe the Internal Revenue Service.  Friedman had just sold a different piece of real estate, and  needed to quickly invest the money in real estate (or as he referred to it, to “park” the money ) in a separate property for a period of several years as is allowed by IRS rules; at the period, the tribe would be allowed to buy the property back for the same price for which it was sold to Friedman per a “buy back option.”

Dickstein and Opper recommended that the tribe “accommodate” Friedman, and Friedman consequently purchased the property from the tribe.

Per their written agreement, the tribe was given the option to buy back the property within one year.  However, the tribe did not buy back the property within one as  a result of a failure by Arlen Opper and Howard Dickstein — the attorney for the tribe who was in possession of the written agreement — to inform the tribe when the time period expired so that the tribe could buy back the property.  Notably, the property had increased in value “exponentially” during this period.

Later,  after the “buy back option” had expired, the tribe realized that it had missed the deadline to buy back its 50% share of the property, and sought to do so at that time.  However, Mark Friedman refused to sell it back, claiming that the tribe had missed its deadline.

 

The Emotionally Distressing Story of Injustice Inflicted On Jessica Tavares — Ex-Chairman Of United Auburn Indian Community As Reputation of Thunder Valley Casino At Stake – Part 1

The Elliott Building , 1540 J St. Sacramento
The Elliott Building, 1530 J Street Sacramento, CA 95814. The building is owned by Mark Friedman of Fulcrum Properly Group.  Currently, the Elliott Building is occupied on separate floors by the offices of Howard Dickstein of Dickstein & Zerbi, Fulcrum Property’s Mark Friedman, Arlen Opper, Doug Elmets, Paula Lorenzo of Cache Creek Casino, and The California Tribal Business Alliance (CTBA).
Dickstein, Friedman, and Opper were all named defendants in the matter of Rumsey Band of Wintun Indians / Cache Creek Casino v. Howard Dickstein. The penthouse unit is the official residence of California’s first couple — Governor Edmund Gerald “Jerry” Brown, Jr.  and his wife. (Image: courtesy photo)

The abuse and financial atrocities by attorney Howard Dickstein (on behalf of himself, as well as others) against his clients — Native Americans who are members of various Indian tribes operating casinos in the State of California — is well documented.

Hit hard were the Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation which operates the Cache Creek Casino in Yolo County, the Pala Band of Mission Indians which operates the Pala Casino Resort & Spa in San Diego County, and the United Auburn Indian Community which operates the Thunder Valley Casino in Placer County.

One such incident resulted in the emotionally distressing injustice inflicted on the bona fide founder of Thunder Valley Casino, the ex-chair of the tribe, Jessica Tavares.

Jessica is a proud visionary who was the force behind the economic and cultural revival of the tribe — as well as the revival of surrounding communities.  Sadly, Jessica was ultimately betrayed by a fellow member of the tribe and placed on the proverbial iceberg because she chose honor, integrity, and dignity for herself and for the tribe over the greed and divisiveness promoted by Howard Dickstein in his quest to obtained millions for himself and by extension for his wife,  Jeannine English.

Since 2006, Jeannine English has served as a “public member” of the State Bar of California Board of Governors, an otherwise governmental entity primarily responsible to disciplining errant lawyers.  Despite allegations that Dickstein has committed countless acts of grave misconduct and ethical breaches, Dickstein has never been disciplined by the State Bar of California.  English’s appointment as a public member was courtesy of her California Democratic Party confederates who control California’s legislative branch.

Unfortunately, the two U.S. Senators from California refuse to become involved in these issues despite the fact that  tribal matters fall primarily within federal oversight. Dickstein, in his role as counsel for the tribes, has overseen the tribes’ contributions of millions of dollars to the coffers of the Democratic Party.

Fortunately, Republican Arizona Senator John McCain recently stepped in and called for an investigation of Howard Dickstein.  Similarly, a few months prior to Senator McCain’s announcement, a Yolo County-based rabbi asked the State Bar of California Board of Governors to investigate English and Dickstein.

The J Street Gang of Greed

In approximately 2004, as part of an effort to revitalize its downtown area, the city of Sacramento poured three million dollars into subsidies for the renovation of the “Elliott Building” located at 1530 J Street in Sacramento.  The project was initiated by Mark Friedman of Sacramento-based Fulcrum Property Group and a few of his business partners.

Howard Dicstein, Jerry Brown, Mark Friedman, Doug Elmets
(L-R) California Governor Jerry Brown, Howard Dickstein of Dickstein & Zerbi, Mark Friedman of Fulcrum Property and Doug Elmets (Image:courtesy photos)

Friedman, a man of despicable character, may be a stranger to readers, but he is no stranger to The Leslie Brodie Report given that he was one of the  named defendants in the case of Rumsey vs. Dickstein, which deals primarily with allegations of years of fraud and deceit by Dickstein against his client, the Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation.

One example of such a scheme allegedly perpetrated by Dickstein and Friedman against the tribe deals with a parcel of land situated in West-Sacramento  known as “The Triangle,” an otherwise prime location facing the Sacramento River.

The tribe was urged by defendants Dickstein and its financial advisor Arlen Opper to enter into yet another business relationship with Friedman, through which a parcel of land in “The Triangle” was purchased.  The tribe would own 50% and Friedman and his extended would own 50% of the property.

At one point, Mark Friedman asked the tribe for a favor (or as he put it, an “accommodation”), by which the tribe would sell and Friedman would purchase the tribe’s 50% share in “The Triangle.”

Friedman’s excuse  for seeking the “accommodation” was very simple — he wanted to reduce the amount of money he would  owe the Internal Revenue Service.  Friedman had just sold a different piece of real estate, and  needed to quickly invest the money in real estate (or as he referred to it, to “park” the money ) in a separate property for a period of several years as is allowed by IRS rules; at the period, the tribe would be allowed to buy the property back for the same price for which it was sold to Friedman per a “buy back option.”

Dickstein and Opper recommended that the tribe “accommodate” Friedman, and Friedman consequently purchased the property from the tribe.

Per their written agreement, the tribe was given the option to buy back the property within one year.  However, the tribe did not buy back the property within one as  a result of a failure by Arlen Opper and Howard Dickstein — the attorney for the tribe who was in possession of the written agreement — to inform the tribe when the time period expired so that the tribe could buy back the property.  Notably, the property had increased in value “exponentially” during this period.

Later,  after the “buy back option” had expired, the tribe realized that it had missed the deadline to buy back its 50% share of the property, and sought to do so at that time.  However, Mark Friedman refused to sell it back, claiming that the tribe had missed its deadline.

Addendum to 1530 J. St. Gang of Greed [ Mark Friedman (Owner), Jerry Brown, Howard Dickstein, Doug Elmets, Arlen Opper], CTBA – Dec of Paula Lorenzo of Cache Creek Casino (TLR Note: PL bamboozled by Dickstein to Buy @ J; Dickstein Keeps Key)

1530 J Street

Jerry Brown – The Company He Keeps: Profile of California Tribal Business Alliance (TLR Note: 1- 1530 J St. Similar to Jerry Brown, Howard Dickstein, Mark Friedman, Arlen Opper, Doug Elmets 2- Lorenzo Controled by Dickstein 3- Thanks to Ex-Pala for Data)

California Tribal Business Alliance
Employer Identification Number (EIN) 113726102
Name of Organization California Tribal Business Alliance
In Care of Name Paula Lorenzo
Address 1530 J St Ste 400, Sacramento, CA 95814-2055
Subsection Board of Trade
Ruling Date 03/2007
Deductibility Contributions are not deductible
Foundation All organizations except 501(c)(3)
Organization Corporation
Exempt Organization Status Unconditional Exemption
Tax Period 12/2010
Assets $500,000 to $999,999
Income $1,000,000 to $4,999,999
Filing Requirement 990 (all other) or 990EZ return
Asset Amount $882,547
Amount of Income $1,002,726
Form 990 Revenue Amount $1,002,726
National Taxonomy of Exempt Entities (NTEE) Community Improvement, Capacity Building: Promotion of Business

Amount of income in 2010: $1,002,726

California Tribal Business Alliance:   $1,002,726
Other organizations performing similar types of work:   $84,673

 

Assets in 2010: $882,547

California Tribal Business Alliance:   $882,547

Source:

http://www.faqs.org/tax-exempt/CA/California-Tribal-Business-Alliance.html

 

 

As California Senate President pro tem Darrell Steinberg introduced Senate Bill to allow intrastate online gambling, Doug Elmets discloses Thunder Valley Casino entered into an agreement with London-based online gaming company

The United Auburn Indian Community  , owners of Thunder Valley Casino  , entered into a 10-year agreement with London-based Bwin.party Digital Entertainment PLC, the world’s largest listed online gaming company.

The tribe doesn’t feature online gaming of any kind, but it took the step to forge this partnership should California law be changed to allow online gaming, said Doug Elmets, spokesman for the tribe.

“Our belief is it that it is a matter of ‘when’ not ‘if’ online gaming becomes legal, and the UAIC wants to have a premiere partner when it comes to pass,” Elmets said.

In February, Senate President pro tem Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento) and Roderick Wright, another state senator (D-Inglewood) introduced Senate Bill 1463 to allow intrastate online gambling.

Please continue @:

http://www.bizjournals.com/sacramento/news/2012/05/10/thunder-valley-casino-o…

Bonnie King Avers Controversial Gambling Attorney Howard Dickstein and Mouthpiece Doug Elmets Engage in “Heinous Action” and “Tribal Terrorism” Against Native Americans

In a desperate plea for help, activist Bonnie King is asking members of Congress to bring an end to “tribal terrorism” Howard Dickstein and Doug Elmets inflict on members of various Indian tribes located in California.

According to King, unscrupulous tribal leaders engage in a scheme to “kick out enrolled members without just cause to increase their own wealth and power.” 

King further alleges that the scheme is supported by Howard Dickstein and political consultant Doug Elmets who “are encouraging tribal committees to execute this heinous action. While they drive their nice sports cars, live in huge mansions, and fly in private jets the executive committees are sending disenrolled members into bankruptcy and a loss of sacred heritage. They use false excuses for reasoning, but the disenrollments have only taken place post Indian Gaming. Federal and state governments will not intervene, calling it intertribal issues, so the disenrolled members have no say or recourse”, King stated.

“Something desparately needs to be done about this corruption,” King concluded.

See complete story @:

http://www.change.org/petitions/all-united-states-senators-and-congressmen-am…

Dickstein, a widely-known but controversial figure within California’s Tribal Gambling industry, has been named recently as defendant in a suit seeking unspecified monetary damages. Also named as defendant is Dickstein’s wife, Sacramento-based lobbyist Jeannine English.

The lawsuit alleges that Dickstein and English executed a scheme that caused injury to the Plaintiff, a Southern California resident who claims his privacy and constitutional rights were “egregiously violated.”

Specifically, the suit alleges that in order to camouflage a scheme and make it appear as though it is purely a mundane action by a governmental agency and was not designed to conceal Dickstein’s and English’s own acts of malfeasance, greed, and betrayal, defendants resorted to abusing their considerable “political and legal clout.”

This clout was presumably obtained as a result of the funneling of hundreds of millions of dollars from myriad Tribal Casinos to various state and local governmental agencies/officials, as well as from English’s position as a member of the State Bar of California Board of Governors, and the fact that the president of the State Bar of California, Jon Streeter, and his firm of Keker & Van Nest, represent Howard Dickstein. This , the plaintiff alleges, shows “malice and oppression” on the part of defendants sufficient to justify an award of punitive damages.

Dickstein , who is no stranger to litigation, has been previously named a defendant in a suit advanced by his client, members of the Yocha Dehe Wintun Nations (formerly known as the Ramsey Band of Wintun Indians), which owns and operates the Cache Creek Casino in Brooks, California, an unincorporated community in Yolo County.

In that action, the plaintiffs — who were represented by Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal, Cotchett, Pitre & McCarthy and legal ethics expert Michael Boli — alleged that Dickstein engaged in myriad fraudulent conduct, concealment, conversion (i.e. a non-criminal term referring to the act of theft), breaches of fiduciary duties, misrepresentations, and unjustly enriching himself with tribal money by defrauding the tribe of millions of dollars over more than a decade.

While the suit was pending, further allegations of grave misconduct were leveled against Dickstein and his attorneys of San Francisco-based Keker & Van Nest including claims that evidence was “manufactured.” Later, Dickstein and his lawyers of Keker & Van Nest (presumably, John Keker, Elliot Peters, and Jon Streeter) falsely advertised and misled the public into believing that the Yocha Dehe tribe had only sued Dickstein for conduct which was “negligent” in nature. Dickstein and his legal team neglected to reference the allegations of defrauding the tribe of millions of dollars over more than a decade through fraudulent conduct, concealment, conversion, breaches of fiduciary duties, and misrepresentations which the tribe had leveled against their own attorney.

In nearby Placer County, situated between the cities of Roseville and Lincoln, 50 miles east of Yolo County, where the United Auburn Indian Community operates the Thunder Valley Casino, allegations of greed and betrayal were also leveled against Howard Dickstein by the former chairwoman of the United Auburn Indian Community, the Honorable Jessica Tavares and long-time tribal council member Dolly Suehead.

According to media reports, Tribal Administrator Greg Baker — a Dickstein confederate — disallowed a tribe-funded mailing of a campaign mailer that claims the United Auburn Indian Community has been “bamboozled by an attorney [Howard Dickstein] more interested in filling his garage with Ferraris than serving the interest of our tribe, and the greed of a tribal council that rubber stamps his decision and no longer looks after our best interests.”

Baker, who as it turned out was involved in a separate and unrelated financial scheme, was recently suspended following on the heels of an IRS investigation into allegations of fraud and money-laundering. In affidavits filed by an IRS investigator, it was alleged that Baker was part of a scheme to over-bill the casino/tribe by more than $18 million, which would later be “kicked-back.”

Roman Porter — a long time ally and confederate of California Democratic Party operative Joseph Dunn of embattled online publication Voice of OC who now serves as the executive director of the State Bar of California — was recently hired as Thunder Valley Casino’s new tribal administrator.

 

Howard Dickstein’s proxy Doug Elmets : Journalists report the news; we orchestrate it!

Journalists report the news; we orchestrate it!

Please see @:

http://twitter.com/#!/elmetspr

 

Profile:

Doug Elmets is the founder and president of Elmets Communications – a full spectrum consulting firm serving a broad range of clients in business, government and the political arena.

Elmets is a well-known media and crisis strategist widely sought for his ability to develop and communicate powerful, convincing messages for his clients, including but not limited to: Thunder Valley Casino Resort, the United Auburn Indian Community, Jackson Rancheria Casino, Pala Casino, the Pala Band of Mission Indians, Veterans of Foreign Wars and the Modesto Irrigation District.

Elmets’ record of delivering results is anchored in more than three decades of public affairs experience in government, business and politics, ranging from his years as a White House spokesman in the Reagan Administration to his more recent work for trade associations, Fortune 500 companies, public municipalities, and Native American tribes. Combining his political acumen, coalition-building talents and knack for branding a cause, Elmets provides his clients outstanding service, whether their needs relate to media relations, legislative and regulatory advocacy, community relations or crisis management.

Prior to launching his company in 1996, Elmets managed the government and public relations for oil giant ARCO, working in Los Angeles and Sacramento. As ARCO’s chief lobbyist, he oversaw all of the company’s government and public affairs on the state level and was responsible for corporate relationships with California’s cities and counties. 

Source, please see @:

http://www.elmets.com/about/executives/doug

Doug Elmets on Pala Band of MissionIndians Expulsion 154 people: “Supreme Court held that a tribe’s right to define its own membership has long been recognized as central to its existence “

The Pala Band of Mission Indians on Wednesday expelled 154 people from its North County tribe, according to a Pala spokesman.

The removal of the 154 people appears to be connected to the removal of eight people from its rolls last year.

Those eight people were told in June by the tribe that they did not meet the 1/16th Pala “blood quantum” requirement.

Pala spokesman Doug Elmets said the tribal council made the decision to remove the additional 154 people Wednesday, but he declined to discuss the reason for the removal.

“It is important to remember that the U.S. Supreme Court, in the Santa Clara Pueblo v. Martinez case in 1978, held that a tribe’s right to define its own membership has long been recognized as central to its existence,” Elmets said.

Pala officials said last year that the tribe had 918 members; thus the 154 people expelled Wednesday account for about 15 percent of the tribe.

Those who have been expelled from Pala stand to lose more than $150,000 a year in payments from the tribe’s Pala Casino Resort and Spa, which is about 15 miles north of Escondido. They also will lose their ability to participate in Pala’s tribal government and other benefits, including health care, housing and educational services.

In June, Pala’s executive committee issued a letter to eight individuals, including the children of former Pala Chairman King Freeman, who are descendants of Margarita Brittain, who died in 1925. The letter said those eight people were disenrolled from the tribe because they did not meet the tribe’s required 1/16th Pala blood quantum.

 

Please continue @:

http://www.kumeyaay.com/kumeyaay-news/2663-exclusive-pala-tribe-expels-154-pe…

Members of Pala Band of Mission Indians Ask President Barack Obama for Help in Struggle Against Controversial Gambling Attorney Howard Dickstein

Members of San Diego-based Pala Band of Mission Indians are asking U.S. President Barack Obama for help in their struggle against controversial gambling attorney Howard Dickstein.  

In an article recently published by a former member of the tribe, an eerie comparison was made between “Blood Diamonds” to “Blood Indian Gaming Money.”  According to the article “Gov. Jerry Brown was given $200,000 in “Blood Indian Gaming Money.” 

Moreover, the author alleges that Howard Dickstein controls “the Tribal  Business Alliance, Robert Smith and Doug Elmets. Elmet’s office is in the same building where Gov. Brown has his penthouse pad. So the disenrolled blood $$ don’t have to drip that far to get them all dirty.”

Dickstein , who is no stranger to controversy, has been previously named a defendant in a suit advanced by his client, members of the Yocha Dehe Wintun Nations (formerly known as the Ramsey Band of Wintun Indians), which owns and operates the Cache Creek Casino in Brooks, California, an unincorporated community in Yolo County.

In that action, the plaintiffs — who were represented by Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal, Cotchett, Pitre & McCarthy and legal ethics expert Michael Boli — alleged that Dickstein engaged in myriad fraudulent conduct, concealment, conversion (i.e. a non-criminal term referring to the act of theft), breaches of fiduciary duties, misrepresentations, and unjustly enriching himself with tribal money by defrauding the tribe of millions of dollars over more than a decade.

While the suit was pending, further allegations of grave misconduct were leveled against Dickstein and his attorneys of San Francisco-based Keker & Van Nest including claims that evidence was “manufactured.” Later, Dickstein and his lawyers of Keker & Van Nest (presumably, John Keker, Elliot Peters, and Jon Streeter) falsely advertised and misled the public into believing that the Yocha Dehe tribe had only sued Dickstein for conduct which was “negligent” in nature. Dickstein and his legal team neglected to reference the allegations of defrauding the tribe of millions of dollars over more than a decade through fraudulent conduct, concealment, conversion, breaches of fiduciary duties, and misrepresentations which the tribe had leveled against their own attorney.

In nearby Placer County, situated between the cities of Roseville and Lincoln, 50 miles east of Yolo County, where the United Auburn Indian Community operates the Thunder Valley Casino, allegations of greed and betrayal were also leveled against Howard Dickstein by the former chairwoman of the United Auburn Indian Community, the Honorable Jessica Tavares and long-time tribal council member Dolly Suehead.

According to media reports, Tribal Administrator Greg Baker — a Dickstein confederate — disallowed a tribe-funded mailing of a campaign mailer that claims the United Auburn Indian Community has been “bamboozled by an attorney [Howard Dickstein] more interested in filling his garage with Ferraris than serving the interest of our tribe, and the greed of a tribal council that rubber stamps his decision and no longer looks after our best interests.”

Baker, who as it turned out was involved in a separate and unrelated financial scheme, was recently suspended following on the heels of an IRS investigation into allegations of fraud and money-laundering. In affidavits filed by an IRS investigator, it was alleged that Baker was part of a scheme to over-bill the casino/tribe by more than $18 million, which would later be “kicked-back.”

Roman Porter — a long time ally and confederate of California Democratic Party operative Joseph Dunn of embattled online publication Voice of OC who now serves as the executive director of the State Bar of California — was recently hired as Thunder Valley Casino’s new tribal administrator.

The article concludes by urging the readers to sign a petition: ” The unjustified killing of the souls of tribal members at Pala is not the actions of a sovereign but the actions of a cruel dictatorship that any ruthless dictator in the world would admire. Speak out and sign the petition to the White House    Now!.”

 

The Elliott Building, 1530 J Street Sacramento, CA; Gov. Jerry Brown’s Abode in Sacramento; Offices of Howard Dickstein/Mark Friedman of Ramsey v. Dickstein; Doug Elmets — PR, Thunder Valley Casino (TLR Note: Ample Motive-Opp to Meet/Collude)

One bedroom’s enough for Jerry Brown’s Sacramento home, please see @:

 http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2010/12/20/105587/one-bedrooms-enough-for-jerry.html

 

 

Now That’s Irony: Jerry Brown Lives in a Sacramento Loft…please see @:

http://blogs.laweekly.com/informer/2011/01/jerry_brown_loft_redevelopment.php

 

 

Mark Friedman’s Folcrum Property, please see @:

http://www.fulcrumproperty.com/index.aspx

 

 

Howard Dickstein – Mark Friedman, please see @:

http://articles.latimes.com/2007/oct/10/local/me-tribe10

 

 

Dickstein & Zerbi , please see @:

http://members.calbar.ca.gov/fal/Member/Detail/65638

 

 

Howard Dickstein – Thunder Valley Casino, please see @:

http://www.sacbee.com/2012/01/22/4205410/sacramento-attorney-howard-dickstein…

 

 

Doug Elmets, please see @:

http://blogs.sacbee.com/capitolalertlatest/2010/12/jerry-brown-checking-out-m…

 

 

Misc, please see @:

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/washington/2007/08/keeping-true-to.html

 

 

Howard Dickstein – Jeannine English, please see @:

http://lesliebrodie.blog.co.uk/tags/howard-dickstein/

Gregory Baker — Thunder Valley Casino Tribal Administrator Placed on Leave Amid Allegation of Money Laundering (TLR Note: Respectfully, difficult to conceive how such a scheme went undetected by Howard Dickstein)

In affidavits filed by IRS investigators this week in Sacramento’s U.S. District Court, two men involved with the construction of the Thunder Valley Casino owner’s headquarters compound in Auburn off Indian Hill Road were being linked in allegations of fraud and money-laundering with tribal administrator Gregory Baker.

Baker, according to tribe spokesman Doug Elmets, was placed on leave Wednesday. Baker was described in the affidavit as a close friend for a decade of Darrell Hinz, who is also being targeted in seizure documents.

 

Please continue @:

http://auburnjournal.com/detail/203659.html

Special interests pour money into Brown’s favorite charities | California Watch

Thomas Hawk/Flickr

Jerry Brown’s term as governor promises big returns for the two Oakland charter schools he founded.

So far this year, Brown has raised $2.3 million for the Oakland Military Institute and Oakland School for the Arts. American Indian tribes, foundations and companies that lobby state government regularly poured in donations at Brown’s request.

Brown is about to eclipse what he raised last year, when he already was a powerful draw. Since becoming attorney general in 2007, he’s bagged nearly $15 million for the schools.

State officials can raise unlimited donations for charity, but have to disclose them to the Fair Political Practices Commission. Former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger raised $1.3 million for his After-School All-Stars charity last year.

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Many of the donations Brown solicited this year came from companies that actively lobby the governor’s office:

  • Cisco Systems lobbied the governor on budget tax issues and gave $25,000 to the military school in June.
  • The Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians, which runs a casino in Temecula, gave $25,000 to the arts school in May. The tribe lobbied the governor this year on Internet gambling, which it opposes. Separately, Brown trumpeted the tribe’s support for his budget plan.
  • The Clorox Company Foundation gave $20,000 to the arts school in April. The company has been lobbying the governor on the state’s Green Chemistry Initiative and the state budget.
  • The Pacific Gas and Electric Company gave $50,000 to the schools in April. The company lobbied the governor this year on environmental policy and opposed a bill that would require utilities to get one-third of their electricity from renewable sources by the end of 2020. PG&E didn’t win that fight; Brown signed the bill the same month the donations came in.

Such donations are “problematic for the integrity for the political process” because they can be a way to influence officials and avoid campaign contribution limits, said Loyola Law School Professor Jessica Levinson.

“Rather than giving to me, just give to my favorite charity,” she said. “And I will know because I will have asked for the donation, and I will be appreciative.”

Brown’s office says the donations do not curry favor with the governor.

“These donations represent an opportunity for foundations, businesses and individuals to invest in their communities and help students succeed,” Brown spokesman Evan Westrup wrote in an e-mail. “The Governor is very proud of the two schools he founded in Oakland more than a decade ago. These schools have served thousands of Bay Area students – many the first in their family to go on to college – and he remains committed to their success.”

Bringing in money is a bit easier now that Brown is governor, but it’s still hard work, said Marianne Gaddy, a fundraising consultant who works for the Oakland arts school.

“I think the fact that he’s governor obviously helps,” she said.

Brown sends out an annual fundraising letter for a gala benefiting the arts school. As governor, he doesn’t have time for the follow-up phone calls to donors that he used to do as attorney general and mayor of Oakland, Gaddy said. But Brown still headlines the annual gala, along with stars like Sean Penn, Robert Downey Jr. and Francis Ford Coppola. “They’re friends of his,” explained Gaddy.

Gaddy, who raised money for Brown’s political campaigns in the past, handles the donor calls. Her firm got to keep $97,000 of the $2 million it raised last fiscal year, according to the school’s tax filings. She said no one has ever asked for anything in exchange for a donation.

One of the biggest donors to Brown’s charities has been the American Indian tribe that runs the San Pablo Lytton Casino in the Bay Area. The Lytton Rancheria gave $50,000 to the military school and $100,000 to the arts school this year. The tribe has given $450,000 to the schools since 2007.

The tribe’s spokesman says it’s simple philanthropy.

“Many of the members of the Lytton Rancheria have not had the same economic opportunities as the rest of society, and now that they have the financial means to assist those who are the least able, they are willing to step up to the plate,” said Doug Elmets. “The tribe really needs nothing from the governor or his administration.”

Anne Ruffino, who lives near the San Pablo casino, has “very mixed feelings” about the donations. She calls the casino “sleazy” and is a plaintiff in a lawsuit to shut it down. But she has a hard time objecting to charitable giving.

Ruffino, 67, figures the tribe’s donations are “just making sure that there’s a general good aura about them so that if it comes to someone’s attention, they’ll already sort of be on their side a little bit.”

Thanks in part to Brown’s fundraising, the Oakland School for the Arts has done well for itself.

The school brought in nearly $4 million more than needed for its $6.5 million budget last year. The extra money went to pay off building improvements that provide students with an art gallery, film editing studio, theater and dance floors, according to Executive Director Donn Harris. The building likely will be paid off by January, but the school still needs about $500,000 in donations on top of state funding every year.

It appears that if Brown’s fundraising keeps up its pace, the money he brings in will outstrip those needs. At that point, Harris said, the school would set up an endowment.

The goal is “to not be reliant on Jerry,” said board member Randi Protopappas.

In the meantime, Protopappas sees no problem with the governor soliciting money from special interests.

“It’s not going in his pocket,” she said. “It goes straight to the schools, and it’s benefiting kids.”

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